SCOTUS Sides With Christian Students Whose Free Speech Was Trampled

Conservative Brief

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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a former student at a public Georgia college who sued for “nominal damages” after he was stopped from speaking.

The Court ruled 8-1 that nominal damages claims are enough to establish standing to sue for a constitutional violation.

Chief Justice John Roberts was the only dissenter in the ruling favoring a couple of Christian students who challenged their university for restricting when, where, and how they could speak about their faith and disseminate materials on campus.

Uzuegbunam et al. v. Preczewski et al. first materialized after Chike Uzuegbunam, a student at Georgia Gwinnett College, was stopped by campus police for handing out religious materials on campus, a reported violation of the school’s “Freedom of Expression Policy,” which limited distributions and other expressions to free speech zones only with permission from the administration.