She’s Back: Sarah Palin Advances in Alaska House Special Primary Election

Red State

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On Saturday night, RedState and other Townhall Media outlets provided readers with live updates on the Alaska House special primary election, which was held (unusually) on a Saturday, and begins the process of filling the seat left vacant by the death of Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska). Alaska has just one representative in the lower chamber.

As we previously reported, after former Alaska Governor and 2008 GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin announced she was running for Congress, she nabbed the endorsement of former President Donald Trump in April. Then in May, Palin picked up an endorsement from Elevate PAC, which Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-NY) formed to support “conservative female politicians seeking higher office,” as my colleague Jerry Wilson wrote.

Now, there’s news on the candidate who’s been away from politics a while starting something of a comeback.

On Sunday, CNN projected that Sarah Palin will advance to the late summer general election in a pack of four candidates.

Former Alaska governor and vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin took a step toward a political comeback Saturday, finishing in the top four of a 48-person special primary election and advancing to the August general election to fill the House seat of the late Rep. Don Young, according to a CNN projection.

Palin will be joined in the special general election on August 16 by Republican Nick Begich III, the grandson of former Democratic Rep. Nick Begich, whose plane went missing in 1972 and has never been found, as well as independent Al Gross, who lost a 2020 Senate race and has said he would caucus with Democrats, CNN projects.

Votes are still being tallied to determine the fourth slot, with two candidates who each could make history as the first Alaska Native elected to Congress — former Democratic state Rep. Mary Peltola and Republican Tara Sweeney, who was backed by a coalition of the state’s Native corporations — in fourth and fifth place among the ballots tallied so far.

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